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Tax Deductions and Retirement Limits You Should Be Familiar With

Tax Deductions and Retirement Limits You Should Be Familiar With

| December 08, 2022
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TAX INFLATION ADJUSTMENTS[1]

The Internal Revenue Service announced the tax year 2023 annual inflation adjustments, including the tax rate schedules and other tax changes.

The tax year 2023 adjustments described below generally apply to tax returns filed in 2024.

The tax items for tax year 2023 of greatest interest to most taxpayers include the following dollar amounts:

  • The standard deduction for married couples filing jointly for tax year 2023 rises to $27,700 up $1,800 from the prior year. For single taxpayers and married individuals filing separately, the standard deduction rises to $13,850 for 2023, up $900, and for heads of households, the standard deduction will be $20,800 for tax year 2023, up $1,400 from the amount for tax year 2022.
  • The personal exemption for tax year 2023 remains at 0, as it was for 2022, this elimination of the personal exemption was a provision in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.
  • Marginal Rates: For tax year 2023, the top tax rate remains 37% for individual single taxpayers with incomes greater than $578,125 ($693,750 for married couples filing jointly).The other rates are:
     
    • 35% for incomes over $231,250 ($462,500 for married couples filing jointly);
    • 32% for incomes over $182,100 ($364,200 for married couples filing jointly);
    • 24% for incomes over $95,375 ($190,750 for married couples filing jointly);
    • 22% for incomes over $44,725 ($89,450 for married couples filing jointly);
    • 12% for incomes over $11,000 ($22,000 for married couples filing jointly).


  • For 2023, as in 2022, 2021, 2020, 2019 and 2018, there is no limitation on itemized deductions, as that limitation was eliminated by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.
     
  • The Alternative Minimum Tax exemption amount for tax year 2023 is $81,300 and begins to phase out at $578,150 ($126,500 for married couples filing jointly for whom the exemption begins to phase out at $1,156,300). The 2022 exemption amount was $75,900 and began to phase out at $539,900 ($118,100 for married couples filing jointly for whom the exemption began to phase out at $1,079,800).
     
  • The tax year 2023 maximum Earned Income Tax Credit amount is $7,430 for qualifying taxpayers who have three or more qualifying children, up from $6,935 for tax year 2022. The revenue procedure contains a table providing maximum EITC amount for other categories, income thresholds and phase-outs.
     
  • For tax year 2023, the monthly limitation for the qualified transportation fringe benefit and the monthly limitation for qualified parking increases to $300, up $20 from the limit for 2022.
     
  • For the taxable years beginning in 2023, the dollar limitation for employee salary reductions for contributions to health flexible spending arrangements increases to $3,050. For cafeteria plans that permit the carryover of unused amounts, the maximum carryover amount is $610, an increase of $40 from taxable years beginning in 2022.
     
  • For tax year 2023, participants who have self-only coverage in a Medical Savings Account, the plan must have an annual deductible that is not less than $2,650, up $200 from tax year 2022; but not more than $3,950, an increase of $250 from tax year 2022. For self-only coverage, the maximum out-of-pocket expense amount is $5,300, up $350 from 2022. For tax year 2023, for family coverage, the annual deductible is not less than $5,300, up from $4,950 for 2022; however, the deductible cannot be more than $7,900, up $500 from the limit for tax year 2022. For family coverage, the out-of-pocket expense limit is $9,650 for tax year 2023, an increase of $600 from tax year 2022.
     
  • The modified adjusted gross income amount used by joint filers to determine the reduction in the Lifetime Learning Credit provided in § 25A(d)(2) is not adjusted for inflation for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2020. The Lifetime Learning Credit is phased out for taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income in excess of $80,000 ($160,000 for joint returns).
     
  • For tax year 2023, the foreign earned income exclusion is $120,000 up from $112,000 for tax year 2022.
     
  • Estates of decedents who die during 2023 have a basic exclusion amount of $12,920,000, up from a total of $12,060,000 for estates of decedents who died in 2022.
     
  • The annual exclusion for gifts increases to $17,000 for calendar year 2023, up from $16,000 for calendar year 2022.
     
  • The maximum credit allowed for adoptions for tax year 2023 is the amount of qualified adoption expenses up to $15,950, up from $14,890 for 2022

SOURCE: IRS


RETIREMENT PLAN LIMITS[2][3]

Retirement plan contributions are tax deductible. By putting money aside in a tax-advantaged retirement account, you are saving for your future and also reducing your taxable income. And remember, you have until April 15, 2023, to make your 2022 IRA plan contribution!

 

ROTH PLANS

For Roth accounts, you can only contribute to them if you make less than a certain amount of money. This salary amount was increased for 2023. Note that your contributions may be phased out at certain income levels so it is best to speak with your financial or tax advisor about your specific situation.

CONTACT US with any retirement planning questions you have.

 

 

None of the information in this document should be considered as tax advice. You should consult your tax advisor for information concerning your individual situation. An individual retirement account (IRA) allows individuals to direct pretax income, up to specific annual limits, toward investments that can grow tax-deferred (no capital gains or dividend income is taxed). Individual taxpayers are allowed to contribute 100% of compensation up to a specified maximum dollar amount to their Traditional IRA. Contributions to the Traditional IRA may be tax-deductible depending on the taxpayer's income, tax-filing status and other factors. Taxes must be paid upon withdrawal of any deducted contributions plus earnings and on the earnings from your non-deducted contributions. Prior to age 59½, distributions may be taken for certain reasons without incurring a 10 percent penalty on earnings. Contributions to a Roth IRA are not tax deductible and there is no mandatory distribution age. All earnings and principal are tax free if rules and regulations are followed. Eligibility for a Roth account depends on income. Principal contributions can be withdrawn any time without penalty (subject to some minimal conditions). 403(b) withdrawals are taxed as ordinary income in the year received. Tax penalties and penalties for early withdrawal may apply if funds are withdrawn prior to age 59 ½.

 

  1. https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/irs-provides-tax-inflation-adjustments-for-tax-year-2023
  2. https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/401k-limit-increases-to-22500-for-2023-ira-limit-rises-to-6500
  3. https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/retirement-topics-ira-contribution-limits


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